Frequently Asked Questions

Q: How long will the Home Inspection Take?

A: Most Inspections take about two to four hours in addition to report preparation time. These times may vary depending on the size, age & condition of the home.

Q: Should I be present during the Home Inspection?

A: The purchase of a new home is one of the single most costly investments that a family will make. Along with the extra stresses this will add, there is also the fear factor of, “Will This Home Stand The Test of Time?” It is also important to know what YOU, as the primary investor, are getting for your money.

Q: Why use our Services?

A:  The purchase of a new home is one of the single most costly investments that a family will make. Along with the extra stresses this will add, there is also the fear factor of, “Will This Home Stand The Test of Time?” It is also important to know what YOU, as the primary investor, are getting for your money.

A home inspection is an excellent tool for you, the home buyer, to help determine not only the condition of the home, but to also help foresee any immediate unnecessary additional cost that may go unnoticed without the help of a home inspection. Home inspections are not a prediction of future performance, but can pinpoint existing problem areas.

Q: Do I need an Engineer or a Home Inspector?

A: You need a home inspector. When you hire a home inspector, you are hiring an experienced professional who has training and experience in the building industry. It is the job of the home inspector to not only evaluate the condition of the house’s major systems and structural integrity, but also to evaluate how these systems are working together and identify areas that need to be watched, repaired or replaced.

Your home inspector gives you the “Big Picture” analysis of the house you are purchasing. If the home inspector identifies the need for a costly, detailed analysis of any of the houses’ systems or structures, the inspector will recommend the appropriate professional, which may be an experienced engineer with expertise analyzing that particular system or structure. The need for this kind of expensive, detailed analysis is rare.

Hiring a Professional Engineer on your own can be a disappointing experience. The term “Professional Engineer” does not mean that the individual has training or experience conducting home inspections. Additionally, a home inspection does not involve engineering analysis. Therefore, hiring a “Professional Engineer” to complete a home inspection undoubtedly costs more, but it may not give you the results you desire and deserve.

Q: Why can’t I have someone in my family who is very handy or a contractor, inspect my new home?

A: This is the biggest mistake many potential new homeowners make when purchasing a home. Although the person you are considering may be very skilled, they are not trained or experienced at professional home inspections. Professional home inspection is a unique skill like no other. Professional inspectors get what we call an inspector’s instinct for problems. That instinct takes extensive training and lots of experience doing inspections to develop. Many contractors, and other trades professionals hire a professional home inspector to inspect their homes when they make a purchase.

Q: Do I need a house inspection when my bank is having the house appraised?

A: Yes! A house appraisal is an independent evaluation of the current market value of a house or property. In general, the purpose of an appraisal is to set the current value of a house so that a lender may determine how much it can loan to the buyer. The appraiser looks at similar properties in the area and the prices at which they were sold to set the value of the house.

A house inspector conducts a thorough evaluation of the house’s major systems and structural integrity. Whereas the appraiser is typically working for the bank, the house inspector is working for you. The house inspector identifies items that need replacement or repair prior to closing, which can save you thousands of dollars.

U.S. Department Of Housing And Urban Development (HUD) requires buyers sign a “Consumer Notice” advising them to get a house inspection in addition to a house appraisal before purchasing a house with a FHA mortgage. Additionally, HUD now allows homebuyers to include the costs of appraisal and inspection in their FHA mortgage.

Q: What will the Home inspection cover?

A: A thorough Home Inspection covers everything from roof to the foundation. Your inspector is very thorough! Our home inspection check list covers:

Q: Do you inspect septic systems also?

A: If you are buying a home with a septic tank, you should consider having it inspected by a professional septic contractor. Most home inspectors do not include this type of specialized, “intrusive” inspection. To properly inspect the system, the contractor will need to dig holes to access the underground parts of the system. This will include inspecting the tank, as well as the leach field.

It makes good sense to have the tank pumped at the time of this inspection. A professional septic contractor can perform both the inspection and pump the tank, killing two birds with one stone and assuring that you begin with an empty tank and a system that has been inspected. Often, you can negotiate with the seller to have them pay for the pumping.

Q: What if the Inspection uncovers problems?

A: Our report will tell you the condition of the house, including needed repairs. No house is going to be perfect. It is up to you to decide how any problems the inspection uncovers might affect your decision to purchase. If major problems are discovered, you may want to try negotiating with the seller to have them repaired before closing the deal. Or perhaps the seller will lower the price, or offer more favorable contract terms. In the end, the decision rests with you, but knowing about potential problems, before you buy, gives you the power to negotiate and make the best decisions.

Q: Will you fix the problems you find during the Inspection

A: No. The code of ethics of the Texas Real Estate Commission (TREC) prohibits its members from doing repair work on properties they inspect. This assures that there will never be any conflict of interest by the inspector. Our purpose is to provide an unbiased, objective third party report on the condition of the home.

However, if you had another inspector do the inspection on your property we would be happy to give you an estimate and handle any repairs that inspector found.

Q: What if I have questions after the home inspection?

A: You can call us and discuss all the aspects of your new home whenever you like. Our service is a long-term investment.

Q: We just signed a contract on a home and our Realtor says we need an inspection “right now”. Can you help?

A: We understand the short turnaround time required sometimes and will do our best to accommodate your situation. We even have Saturday hours available to help meet your contract deadlines.

Q: Does the inspection warrant or guarantee the home?

A: No, the home inspection does not provide a warranty or guarantee. There are home warranty companies regulated by the Texas Real Estate Commission which sell such policies. Although somewhat limited, they usually prove to be a worthwhile expense. Please consult with your real estate agent for more information.

“We can help ensure that your choice of homes is a sound one…”